Bookworms

Driftwood Garden Club Bookworms!

Many of our members have belonged to book clubs over the years and most still do! Reading in the garden is one of our great joys. In the garden, we can read alone, with others, and especially to our children and grandchildren. Our members have read many books about flowers, plants, insects, trees, and the wildlife our gardens provide for, so we thought it might be nice to start a reading list created by members to recommend flower or nature-themed books which have been enjoyed over time.

DGC Reading List

We welcome you to help create the Driftwood Garden Club Reading List by making book suggestions or comments. To suggest a book, click here

Let’s give it a try!

For our Gardeners

Recommended by Ginny Von Rueden

The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh

“A young woman with a difficult childhood finds her only connection to the world is through flowers and their meanings. She realizes she has a gift for helping other through the flowers she chooses for them”.

The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert

“A novel about a 19th century American woman who becomes a world-renowned botanist…travels the world meeting unforgettable characters..and explores the mysteries of evolution”

The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben

“One of the most beloved books of our time: an illuminating account of the forest, and the science that shows us how trees communicate, feel, and live in social networks. After reading this book a walk in the woods will never be the same again.”

Unearthing the Secret Garden by Marta McDowell

Bestselling author Marta McDowell has revealed the way that plants have inspired some of our most cherished authors, including Beatrix Potter, Emily Dickinson, and Laura Ingalls Wilder. In her latest, she shares a moving account of how gardening deeply inspired Frances Hodgson Burnett, the author of the beloved children’s classic The Secret Garden. Complementing her fascinating account with charming period photographs and illustrations, McDowell paints an unforgettable portrait of a great artist and reminds us why The Secret Garden continues to touch readers after more than a century. This deeply moving and gift-worthy book is a must-read for fans of The Secret Garden and anyone who loves the story behind the story

For our L’il Sprouts

Recommended by Barbie Saraceno

Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt by Kate Messner

Explore the secret world beneath the dirt that brings the world of nature to life: up in the garden, the world is full of green—leaves and sprouts, growing vegetables, ripening fruit. But down in the dirt exists a busy world—earthworms dig, snakes hunt, skunks burrow—populated by all the animals that make a garden their home. With Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt, you can explore the hidden world and many lives of a garden through the course of a year!

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgsen Burnett

One of the most delightful and enduring classics of children’s literature, The Secret Garden by Victorian author Frances Hodgson Burnett has remained a firm favorite with children the world over ever since it made its first appearance. Initially published as a serial story in 1910 in The American Magazine, it was brought out in novel form in 1911.

Well Loved Gardening Reference Books

Recommended by Harriett Magee

The Well-Tended Perennial Garden by Tracy DiSabato-Aust

This is an encyclopedic guide to planting and pruning techniques, detailing differences among deadheading, cutting back, disbudding, thinning and when/what season and how to apply these techniques. Author also covers design, pests and diseases, staking, and dividing. This 415-page book is well organized, easy to use, and beautifully illustrated with photos.

To suggest a book, click here

Uncategorized

Mindfulness in the Garden!

Mindfulness coach Michele Frank Schuckel speaks to Driftwood Garden Club members.

In March 2022, members of the Driftwood Garden Club walked down a different garden path (figuratively!) with our guest speaker Michele Frank Schuckel. Michele, who is a registered nurse, a mindfulness coach, and a master gardener, described gardening as a mindful activity. She touched on the things we can control and the things we can’t control, and gave us useful suggestions to practice. Among the many wellness choices for longevity and health for gardeners, we should strive to cultivate connections; exercise; grow and eat a rainbow of foods; hydrate; and rest.  She says, “feed your plants and your purpose.”

Wellness is health in mind and body. Wellness is having the tools to navigate the ups and downs of life. Wellness is self-compassion, and compassion for others. Wellness is being present in your life.

Ms. Schuckel suggests we all cultivate an attitude of gratitude with ourselves, with each other, and in our gardens!